Paper: The State of the Hong Kong Chinese Community in the Greater Toronto Area

In 1979 , he organized a demonstration to urge the federal government to admit more ‘boat people’ - community members were appalled. 'Don't rock the boat’ was exactly what they said. They said that Canada had given them a shelter and they should not demand any rights. Later that year, W5 - a CTV public affairs program - aired a segment called Campus Giveaway, which was about Chinese students taking over Canadian universities and leaving Canadian students out in the cold. Within 2 to 3 months, there were 16 anti-W5 committees. The protest eventually forced W5 to offer an unqualified apology. Those 16 groups went on to form the Chinese Canadian National Council. 'We learned the Canadian way of handling injustice.’ Richard Ling, a lawyer, disagrees with Wong's assertion that the community lacks the confidence to flex its political muscles. ‘| don't think the problem comes from lack of confidence or lack of sophistication because...a lot of the people who came from Hong Kong came from reasonably successful backgrounds.’ Ling says that it's the parties themselves that are holding back the community from playing a meaningful role in politics. Ling says that another major barrier is the tendency for those in power to choose a community representative who becomes 'their eyes, ears and mouthpiece for the government at any level." When Ling organized a fundraising event for the Liberal Leader Lyn McLeod, he planed to had over a cheque for $250,000 to McLeod. When they did not promise her attendance, Ling canceled it and id it for Mike Harris instead. 'I'm trying to get some assess into the government. If you want to deny me access then I'll get somebody else to listen to me.’ ‘To read in the newspaper that Lyn McLeod or the liberal party felt part of the reason they lost is because the ethnic communities could not support a female leader, to me, it's pouring salt on insult,’ Ling says....