Paper: The Issue of Plagiarism in the Schools of the United States

99. A study from Donald L. McCabe of Rutgers University shows that:On most campuses, over 75 percent of students admit to some cheating. In a 1999, and 2001 survey of 2,100 students on 21 campuses across the country, about 1/3 of the participating students admitted to serious test cheating and half admitted to one or more instances of serious cheating on written assignments.Academic honor codes effectively reduce cheating. Surveys conducted in 1990, 1995, and 1999, involving over 12,000 students on 48 different campuses, demonstrate the impact of honor codes and student involvement in the control of academic dishonesty. Serious test cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes. The level of serious cheating on written assignments is 1/4 to 1/3 lower. On campuses without honor codes, 1/5 to 1/4 of students acknowledge chronic test cheating (admitting to three or more incidents of serious test cheating). On campuses with honor codes, typically less than 10% admit to such chronic test cheating.Faculties are reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. Less than half of 800 faculty surveyed on 16 campuses in 1992 say they have ever reported a student for cheating. In a 1999 survey of over 1,000 faculty on 21 campuses, 1/3 were aware of student cheating in their course in the last two years, and did nothing to address it. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating.A study of almost 4,500 students at 25 schools, conducted in 2000/2001, suggests cheating is also a significant problem in high school - 74 percent of the respondents admitted to one or more instances of serious test cheating and 72 percent admitted to serious cheating on written assignments. Over half of the students admitted they have engaged in some level of plagiarism on written assignments using the Internet....