Paper: The Formation in the Movie Kafka and the Explanation of Kafkaesque

Another surrealistic, although short lived, scene in the castle is when Kafka exits the file room from which he entered the castle in and enters a five sided hallway with a staircase and door for each side. Kafka, being the ingenious one, recognizes the possible dilemma that could arise once he wants to leave the castle and marks his staircase with ink. Seeing this hallway from above and its symmetry shows us how confusing life can be. No one would ever design a set of staircases as such, which is what makes it so Kafkaesque. A major scene in the castle was the scene in which Dr. Murnau's lab is revealed to Kafka. If there's a more surrealistic scene, | haven't seen it. It is utterly absurd that to study the brain of a human one must place them under an enormous microscope, and look through it probably three stories up. The surrealistic nature of the scene is pushed even further when Kafka is attempting to escape from the lab by walking across the huge lens that is used as the microscope. We first see that the lens is showing us the brain of the man under the microscope, but soon that man breaks free and all we see is blackness. Then, when one of Kafka's assistants becomes curious and looks up into the giant microscope, we see Kafka walking across a huge eye. Not something one sees everyday. One character in particular stands out as absurd, almost to the point of laughing. The wild and hideous laughing man is a clear representation of what defines Kafkaesque. The idea that a normal man could be transformed into this beast of a man that will do anything, even commit murder, for a small vial of what we can only assume is drugs is ludicrous. Another defining aspect of something that is Kafkaesque is its weariness of routine, or the general humdrum of life. Most of this facet of Kafkaesque takes place in Kafka’s office. The first being the repetition of the employees punching in at the beginning of the workday....