Paper: Taking a Chance in Something Unseen and Intangible in the Village Atheist by Joel Mcdurmon

In line 7, he isolates “coughing myself to death” in order to accentuate the vivid imagery of a decrepit man on his death bed, coughing up blood and dying a slow death. He isolates line 12, “could not extinguish" in order to emphasize the dominance of the light over the darkness, the torch over the shadow." Using allusions to the Bible, Masters introduces the light because the “torch of hope and intuition" (line 9) is symbolic of God, “a light shining in a dark place" (2 Peter 1:17). “For God is light, in Him there is no darkness at all" (1 John 1:5). Lines 13 and 14, “Listen to me, ye who live in the senses and think through the senses only”, is also an allusion to the bible. Psalm 49:1 says "Here this, all you peoples; listen all who live in this world only." The Village Atheist's message is not to concern yourself with being "well versed in the arguments of the infidels" (lines 4 and 5) because "the wisdom of this world is foolishness in God's sight" (1 Corinthians 3:19). Masters uses these allusions to the Bible because The Village Atheist found religion and peace in the "poetry of Jesus" (line 8). Masters uses metaphors in order to create vivid imagery. Line 9 introduces the metaphor of a “torch of hope and intuition and desire" in order to create vivid imagery of seeing the light. He extends the metaphor in the next few lines, expanding to the Shadow, the antithesis of the torch of hope, intuition and desire. Masters uses this metaphor in order to create visions of a battle between good and evil, and the predominance of the "light" over the "darkness." This battle between opposing forces is further realized through the balanced antithesis in lines 15 and 16. "Immortality is not a gift. Immortality is an achievement." Figuratively, the entire poem is a balanced antithesis between importance of religion and the futility of atheism....