Paper: An Introduction to the Life of Jefferson Davis

Jefferson Davis (rough draft) Born in Kentucky, Jefferson Davis lived from June 3, 1808 to December 6, 1889. He attended Transylvania University, graduated West Point, and became an American statesman and leader of the confederacy during the civil war, which he served between 1861-1865. He fought in the Mexican American war as a volunteer in the regiment named Mississippi Rifle. Earlier he married his first wife, Sarah Taylor, who was the daughter of his commander and future President of the United States, Zachary Taylor, although they married against Taylors wishes. They both got malaria while on their honeymoon, which she died from 3 months after they got married. Davis resigned his commission and became a cotton farmer like his brother, Joseph. Then he became a decocrat and entered politics. He got elected to the House of Representatives in 1845 and also married his second wife, Varina Howell. Davis left congress in 1846 and took the 1[st] Mississippi Regiment and fought in the Mexican American war. At the battles of Monterrey (1846) and Buena Vista (1847), he served under his first Father-In-law, Zachary Taylor. At the Buena Vista battle, he was hurt and got national recognition for helping resist a charge by Mexican lances. His ex father-in-law, and commander, reportedly told him "my daughter, sir, was a judge of men than | was." Later that year, Davis was selected for the U.S. Senate. Davis was a believer of slavery and fought for State's rights. California was taken from Mexico during the Mexican American war and was to be admitted to the Union as a "free State" opposed to slavery. The Southern States feared that their balance of power would be destroyed if this happened. This created havoc in congress at the end of 1849 and during Taylors presidency. Davis challenged and Illinois congressman to a duel over this issue because house members were so stressed and concerned about it. When a President of the United States takes office, he takes what is called the "Oath of Office". The "Oath or Affirmation of Office" is what the President of the Confederate States was required to take. This oath/affirmation was added to the Confederate States Constitution. When Jefferson Davis took the oath on February 18, 1861, he added the words "so help me GOD" to the end of the oath, as stated in article 2, section 1, clause 10. Jefferson Davis was the only person to hold the position of the President of the Confederate States. He held office from February 18, 1861 to May 10, 1865; Alexander Stephens was his Vice President. The Confederate States was formed from the states that withdrew from the "United States," which was a cause of the civil war. Jefferson Davis was captured on May 10, 1865, hence the end of his Presidency of the Confederate States. He was charged with treason, and even though he was never tried, was never allowed in politics again. ...