Paper: An Introduction to Management of Information Systems (MIS) Directors

Computers have revolutionized the working world, opening up countless new jobs and opportunities. For example, before computers existed, there were no such things as computer programmers, operators, software engineers, computer-aided drafting, and information system managers. Computer programmers code information into the computer to tell it how to do its functions. Computer operators oversee the operation of computer hardware. Software engineers develop new programs for a computer to run. Those who work in the field of computer-aided drafting prepare technical drawings used to construct things. Information system managers do everything from constructing a business plan to overseeing network operations. Management of Information Systems (MIS) directors are often in the position of overseers because they direct the work of systems analysts and support specialists, as well as those who work in the fields listed above. They are also increasingly involved in the maintenance of networks and intranets. Most companies hire MIS directors who have completed college with a bachelors degree, but many would prefer a graduates degree or a masters degree in business. Although technology is essential, MIS directors need a broad range of skills including interpersonal, communication, and leadership skills. For example, though a MIS director can explain technical information to subordinates, he/she can also explain what is happening in laymans terms to customers or their superiors. Employment of MIS directors is expected to increase dramatically over the next few years, especially since most schools of higher education offer courses and degrees for MIS. Today, the average MIS director earns about $78,830 per year. However, this pay comes at a cost. MIS directors are more in danger of contracting problems with their eyes, backs, hands, and wrists. Forty-hour weeks, plus occasional evenings and weekends, can also strain the mind and body. Currently, | am applying to colleges for a position in their computer science classes. Computer science is a stepping-stone to becoming a MIS director, which is my first career goal. If, however, | do not succeed in MIS, | would like to return to college and get my teaching degree, so | can teach a high school computers course. ...