Paper: An Analysis of the Topic of the Schumann's Composing Life

One of the greatest masters of music, , was born on May 7, 1833 in the city of Hamburg, Germany. His father, a double-bass player at the Hamburg Orchestra, was his first teacher, but the man who gave Brahms his first real appreciation for music was Eduard Marxsen. Brahms became very good as a child pianist, and played at a public concert in Hamburg at the age of 14. He also earned some money playing in the local taverns. While playing in the taverns, he met the Hungarian violinist Remenyi, and went on tour with him throughout Germany. Aman named Joseph Joachim heard Brahms play and sent him to meet Liszt and Schumann, also composers. Liszt enjoyed many of Brahms’ works, but their relationship never really grew into a friendship. Schumann also enjoyed many of Brahms' works, and Brahms became good friends with Robert Schumann and his wife, Clara. In a famous article, "Neue Bahnen"(New Paths), Schumann saluted the twenty year old Brahms as “The coming genius of German music." Schumann also arranged for the publication of Brahms’ three piano sonatas and three sets of songs. In 1862, Brahms traveled to Vienna, where he conducted the concerts of Singakademie. The next five years he spent travelling to various towns, such as Hamburg, Baden Baden, and Zurich. In 1868 he was back in Vienna and he spent three years conducting orchestral concerts of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde. . After more travel in Germany, Brahms again made his home in Vienna in 1878. Meanwhile, his fame as a composer was growing and growing. In 1886, he was made a Knight of the Prussian "Orde pour le merite," and was also elected a member of the Berlin Academy of Arts. In 1889, Brahms was presented with the freedom of his native city, Hamburg, an honor which was the most sacred to him. While all of this was happening, Brahms continued composing. His first ten years were extremely productive, as he wrote several works. He continued writing and conducting music until he died on April 3, 1897. Brahms was noted for his good nature, modesty, and humor. He had no personal enemies, and did not usually criticize the works of others. Brahms was never married; he lived the life of a simple middle classed citizen, and enjoyed fairly good health until the last years of his life. He died from cancer of the liver. The appreciation of Brahms in the music world grew much after his death. In 1906, Berlin founded the Deutsche Brahmsgesellschaft, with the aim of publishing books about Brahms. Many Brahms societies were also formed in other German and Austrian cities. In the United States, the music of Brahms was received coldly at first, but soon many people loved it and accepted it. People are frequently performing his works, and his works are nearly the most performed, second only to Beethoven. The literature dealing with Brahms is increasing more and more each year, with many new translations in many different languages. ...