Paper: An Analysis of the 1911's China Revolution

This lead to a decline in Chinese industry and a debasement of the Chinese currency. The exhausting corruption which soured the lower levels of government and the way top positions in the government were monopolised ruthlessly added the peoples general tiredness of the way things were run. The above points are the money problems that plagued China, but many of the problems were more to do with the mental attitude of the Chinese people. The scramble for concessions and the way the foreigners controlled the Manchu government led to dissatisfied and humiliated feelings among the Chinese people. When the Boxer Protocol was enforced the Manchu had to agree to even more foreign demands and when they failed to intervene in the Russo-Japanese war (fought on Chinese soil) anti-Manchu and anti-foreign feeling increased. This lead to a rising Nationalism that said the Manchu were strangers and had they had no right to be in control of China. As the treaty ports grew and flourished the people living there were exposed to many foreign ideas and the urbanised population quickly became tamely Westernised. Many had the idea that change in the old way of government was a good thing. These ideas were supported by the students that had studied abroad and had strong ideas on democracy. Stemming from the idea of a constitutional monarchy came radical ideas like abolishing the monarchy altogether. An overwhelming cause for the revolution could have been the general suffering and distress of the population due to natural disasters like floods, droughts and famines, plagues and the fact that as Chinas ever-increasing population swelled, food became harder to come by. Life in China was prevailing difficult for those not in the upper-class. So although new ideas and thoughts were abundant, food and secure living was not. Basically the whole country was restful and ready for change....