Paper: An Analysis of Shiley Jackson's The Lottery

“They do say ..... that over in north village there talking of giving up the lottery..... ," and "..... some places have already quit lotteries..... (513)." When Old Man Warner, who represents the village elders, heard people talking of giving up the lottery he harshly repermened them. "..... pack of crazy fools.....next thing you know, they'll be wanting to go back to living in caves, nobody working anymore..... (513)." The author uses Old Man Warner to encarnate the voice of tradition. He is also used to reiderate the story's theam by saying, “.....there's always been a lottery..... (613)." Just because a tradition has always been followed doesn't necessarily mean it is correct thing to do. The most fightening concept is that the childern are being taught to accept the tradition of the lottery without question. "The childern assembled first, of course (510)," and "Bobby Martin had already stuffed his pockets full of stones, and soon the other boys followed his example, slecting only the smoothest and roundest stones (510)." Indeed, the childern are being taught to accept the lottery without question, but when people are raised with certain traditions and belifes they don't tend to seem abnormal or wrong. “......Mr. Graves took the hand of the little boy who came willingly with him to the black box.....," and ".....little Davey put his hand into the box and laughed......," and they told him to,"..... take just take one paper..... (514)." When the audience reads this chilling scean the story's theam truely hits home, and the barbaricness of the ritual is plain to see. This village was willing to stone that little boy for the sake of some forgotten tradition. In conclusion, the message of the lottery is clear, barring come unforseen intervention, the cruelty of the lottery will continue, and more innocent people will be stoned to death for no reason....