Paper: An Analysis of New Hampshire: Republican or Democrat

A Large portion of District 1s population lives in an urban area. Although, as a whole New Hampshire is spilt 51% urban 49% rural, this difference in district 1 doesnt seem to effect how it compares to the state in voting trends. Its major industries include health care, insurance, and computer manufacturing. Manchester, in particular, is booming as a high-tech city. While on a whole, New Hampshires economy depends on many industries including dairy, nursery stock, cattle, machinery, electric equipment, rubber and plastic products, and tourism. One of New Hampshires major issues, income tax, has always set it apart from the other states. Low taxes, no income tax, and keeping welfare and education as local responsibilities worked well for New Hampshire until recently. The Supreme Court has ruled that the school districts must be funded equally and that means that the state is going to have to step in and give districts more money. Many plans are being considered right now as to how to go about this. New Hampshire practically forced (unless candidates wanted to commit political suicide) all elected officials to take the pledge. This pledge, which came about in 1970 from the Union Leader, a politically conservative New Hampshire newspaper, said that officials would not vote for any kind of sales or income tax. Until 2000, when Shaheen decided not to take the pledge, no other candidate who had not taken the pledge had been elected. This shows another shift from the old New Hampshire. Going into the 2002 elections, income tax and a plan to support the schools is still up in the air and is bound to play a major issue in the elections. Another issue, already being debated in the 2002 campaigns, is the environment. With half the state being rural, protecting the environment and agricultural lands is a major concern for voters. In the past, even republicans have been more environmentally conscious than their U.S. counterparts....