Paper: An Analysis of Animal House by National Lampoon

Everyone knows guys like Otter (Tim Matheson), Boone (Peter Riegert), and Flounder (Stephen Furst). You have to admit that you knew someone in high school like D-Day (Bruce McGill). These characters almost feel like your friends (and enemies) as you watch the movie. You root for the Deltas as they break every rule and drink all the beer. Thanks to this movie, the toga party became a fraternity institution. It was this movie that taught us that food fights were good, clean fun. For some of us, it became the model of what college life should be. Today, there are still many fraternities that believe Bluto is a god among men and live their freshman year trying to emulate him. For most people -- the ones with common sense -- it was a really funny movie that took spoofs to a new level. I'm not sure how many "firsts" this movie is responsible for. Certainly, it was the first film appearance of Kevin Bacon, starting the whole six degrees thing. It would appear it was the first modern "teen comedy," spawning an entire genre. It was the first comedy that | ever saw give humorous "what happened to them" endings for the main characters. And it's probably the first film to get laughs from an angel and devil arguing on a guys shoulder. No mention of Animal House is complete without mentioning the music. The film features one early sixties classic after another, and features two "performances" by "Otis Day and the Knights." If they aren't a real band, they give a heck of a lip-synch job. I'd also like to add that the movie was filmed on location at the University of Oregon, which very much lends to the overall feel of the film. It puts you right there in college. In short, Animal House is like one long frat party that you're invited to. Pitting the two factions of college life against one another was a perfect premise for a nice, mindless flick that really was funny, even if it wasn't an all-out perfect film. It is a classic in any case....