Paper: A Literary Analysis of to Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Major Essay BeginningsBeginnings are a common theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, there are many changes occurring in the small southern town of Maycomb. People are maturing and the town is changing its views on Racism. More specifically Jem is reaching puberty, maturity is also another form of beginning and overall Maycomb is becoming more culturally acceptable. Beginnings are sometimes considered evolving and these situations would all fall under that heading. Jem is reaching puberty and with that his is becoming maturer, more responsible and more gentleman like, like his father Atticus. When Jem shows his chest hair to his sister Scout that one night, he does quite secretly and when he finish's he makes certain that Scout keeps this a secret. Boys while going through puberty often try to hide it, but as it progresses it becomes noticeable so Jem may run into difficulties. What Jem does not know as yet is the fact that soon he will no longer be a boy and therefore will have different goals in life. Jem also becomes more responsible towards the end of the book he goes to Mrs. Dubose house and reads for an entire month. With this knew chores he gains maturity and responsibility. He is being made to do something he finds awful without complaint, this shows maturity and responsibility. The Maturity of Children in this begins off in To Kill a Mockingbird quite low but as the story progresses we see the children introduced to many of the worlds problems, of which they embrace with a high level of maturity. Their treatment of Boo and Scout's treatment of the other kids going to school shows a low-level maturity. For example Scout often resorts to violence to solve her difficulties. "You can just take that back, boy!"" when Scout says this she is taking on Cecil Jacobs for a good reason (racism) but people should not turn to violence to solve their problems. However when the children are introduced to poverty Jem handles it well and Scout does not (she is 5 years younger). “Jem wanted Dill to know once and for all that he wasn't scared of anything" page 14. Jem's attitude shown here is a low-level of maturity, many men display this and it is called pride! When the two children go to see what happens to their father when Tom is in the county jail. They are showing compassion and love for their father another form of maturity. Prejudice; Prejudice is a very common form of discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird. On a general view of the book and it's setting we still have the Black White problem, which becomes very apparent to the readers latter on in the story when Tom Robinson is killed. “And so a quiet, respectable, humble Negro who had the unmitigated temerity to “feel sorry" for a white woman has to put his word against two white people's. Another form of prejudice is the treatment of Boo Radley and his family, who the community looks at with disgust. These are the two most obvious forms of prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird. ...