Paper: A History of Japanese Earthquake

Once the earthquake was over they were a) relieved (“Tremors”), b) worried about their families and friends (“Understanding”), c) confused (“Vertical”), d) found themselves taking action (“Voices”), e) were eager to express support (“Waiting”). When they learnt about the earthquake being away from the affected area, they a) felt helpless (“Really?”), b) feeling guilty (“Relief”), c) cried (“Remoteness”), d) were sympathetic (“Strong”), e) worried for their friends (“Understanding”). And here are the emotions that people had in response to the earthquake: a) horrified (“Waiting”), b) desperate (“Window’), c) confused (“Test”), d) shaken (“Shaken”) and e) decisive (“Same”). It is displayed in many short stories that Japanese people were prepared to earthquakes. However, it still affected them both emotionally and physically. Whereas many tried to hide their emotions (“Same”), (“Vertical”) and just turned pale when first tremors were felt, others showed more emotion. They ran and cried (“Tremors”). Judging by the above reactions and feelings, there was a lot of confusion, fear and distress. At the same time, people showed decisiveness and action. They helped one another and showed a lot of sympathy and support. Reactions certainly differed depending on whether the person experienced the earthquake personally or not. While people in the earthquake showed more fear and distress, those who were at a distance had a lot of sympathy and, strange as it is, felt “survivor's guilt”. There are several conclusions that can be drawn from those stories. Firstly, if people are trained, they survive earthquakes more effectively. Secondly, although cultures differ in many things, people act very similar in emergencies. Thirdly, there is a lot of compassion in the world despite historical and cultural differences (“Strong”, “Tremors”)....