Paper: A Biography of Marguarite Vogt a Scientist

This article was about a 89 year old woman named Marguarite Vogt. She was a daughter of a neuroscientist in prewar Germany and is that is the reason she became a scientist. Not only has Vogt lived and worked longer than most scientists, she started earlier, publishing her first paper in a scientific journal at age 14. Her most celebrated discovery came at Caltech in 1950, when she developed the methods that led to the successful culture of the polio virus. She published her last paper, in collaboration with UCSD's Martin Haas and Jo Yeargin, four years ago. Until 1937, Vogt grew up on the compound of the Kaiser Wilhelm/Max-Planck Institute of Brain Research in Berlin, where her father, Oskar, was director and her mother, Cecile, also a neurologist, worked. When their two daughters were born ? Marthe in 1903 and Marguerite in 1913 ? the Vogts crafted scientific expectations for them as well. Her earliest work was so demanding that Vogt had to wake up every two hours to check on her breeding flies. She said, "I was like a fish in water, never thinking of coming out, to me it was natural that | become a scientist." And now, she says, it is no different. “My work is my pleasure. | don't consider it work." Vogt joined Caltech's virology laboratory, where scientists had secured funding from the March of Dimes to work on polio virus. Renato Dulbecco, her boss and one year her junior, set her up in an isolated basement laboratory because the work was dangerous. She, however, was undaunted. "I was never afraid. | was trained as an M.D., and as an M.D. you touch people with many diseases without thinking about it." Two years ago she moved from La Jolla to Del Mar, to an assisted living facility with a main room large enough for Bechstein. Now she?s living a peaceful life, but she is still involved in the science community. And she says ?I've not done anything great? ...